Hi everybody, I’ve been using linux for over 15 years with a huge gap in between. I think i stopped at 14 (Ubuntu) something and started again at 20 something. So i had to learn alot again. Luckily it all came back quick. Now since this week I started linux from scratch to learn more about the way it’s build. I’m also going to get some education to point myself in the direction of a linux job. I just love the way it works. It makes sense to if you now what I mean (which you probably do)

I have two questions. Are there things I should try with LFS after completing my build? And what are some good linux educational sites? I’m currently thinking of the linux foundation. Anyway thanks for reading. Greeting from Belgium! Mr. Nowhereman

  • thelastknowngod@lemm.ee
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    11 months ago

    Knowing this stuff is fine but make sure to keep your goals in mind. If the idea is to get a job, figuring out how Bluetooth works isn’t going to get you anywhere. You need to move in the direction the wider industry is moving. That direction is running containers in kubernetes.

    If you can stand up a kube cluster, write a Prometheus exporter in go, scale pods based on those metrics, and auto resize workloads’ resource requests, then you should be able to find a job without much trouble… These are the things ops people are expected to do in 2023.

    EDIT: The CNCF is a great resource for modern tooling.

    • pelotron@midwest.social
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      11 months ago

      figuring out how Bluetooth works isn’t going to get you anywhere

      cries in Embedded Systems Development

    • NowheremanOPA
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      11 months ago

      Valid point. Kubernetes didn’t really grab my attention (yet) Maybe it should.

      • thelastknowngod@lemm.ee
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        11 months ago

        Kube solves a ton of really complicated problems. I think a big part of the learning curve is just understanding what those problems are/were to know why we are all doing this in the first place.

        Rolling out something like Talos is a good starting point for a sandbox to play around in. When I feel like you understand the basic ideas of things that can be run in kube (deployments, cronjobs, services, ingresses, etc) this is a really great resource to level up your understanding:

        https://github.com/kelseyhightower/kubernetes-the-hard-way

    • Dkarma@lemmy.world
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      11 months ago

      Standing up an enterprise level kube cluster is a 400-500k / year job and not for the faint of heart. It’s like telling someone “just learn c”. Yes containers are big business but the curve can be steep.

      Also op asked for a Linux job…not sure where you made the leap to kube or the “, industry” you’re talking about.

      If op wants to use Linux they should learn sles and rhel and rocky Linux, their differences in functionality and networking tools and apply for an admin job imo.

      • thelastknowngod@lemm.ee
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        11 months ago

        Standing up an enterprise level kube cluster is a 400-500k / year job

        Ha! In what currency? Because it sure as hell isn’t dollars. Average senior level positions are in the high 100 to low 200k range.

        Also, OP is talking about LFS… No one is going to ask them to do that shit either. All of this is a learning exercise. I didn’t say anything about an enterprise level anything. Standing up a cluster is a learning exercise.

        Old school admin jobs are drying up extremely fast. The job market and a MASSIVE amount of development effort is going into the kube ecosystem. If you resist this change, you’re just going to fall behind.

        • Dkarma@lemmy.world
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          11 months ago

          In usd, yes. K8s experts in the right areas can make 400k plus designing k8s clusters, yes I’ve seen it. Maybe not that high admining them.

          Maybe for you clusters are a learning exercise. For enterprise level business they are standard fare and big business/ money.

          Linux admin jobs are everywhere, lol what are you talking about.

          I’ve literally had recruiters drooling over me because I knew what top did and could find my way through a Linux file system.

  • db2@lemmy.world
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    11 months ago

    BeyondLFS. I did both and ran it as my daily on a K6-3 for a couple years.

    • Jumper775@lemmy.world
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      11 months ago

      Enlighten me on running LFS in kubernetes. What are you doing and why? I’ve never heard of this.

      • db2@lemmy.world
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        11 months ago

        LFS in kubernetes

        I’m not sure how to answer that… can Kubernetes be for whole bare metal operating systems?

  • odium@programming.dev
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    11 months ago

    Some things to check on ur lfs:

    • bluetooth audio
    • screenshare (with media audio)
    • mic quality (sometimes there’s a lot of static sound if not tuned properly)
    • try running a game
    • try running other resource intensive software like training an ml model or running 3d cad software
    • try writing to files that you’re not supposed to be able to (without using sudo), to test that you gave the proper read/write/execute access to system files.
  • pastermil@sh.itjust.works
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    11 months ago

    I’ve done LFS myself. After the core build, I moved on to BLFS to actually create something close to an everyday OS. I also tried to index the packages. But after a while, I got tired of all the work and moved on to other distro. I finally settled with Gentoo, with which I can customize the package compilation with way less effort.

    LFS is a great tool for education & practice, but we couldn’t expect it to be productive as there are more effective & efficient tools out there that can do the things you do (and probably more) with way less time and effort.

    One thing one would need to keep in mind is the great deal of effort to maintain the build on top of all the effort creating the build in the first place. If done by the book alone, it’d be like Sisyphus pushing a boulder uphill.

    You can make automation tools for managing packages (or use automated LFS, part of the LFS project), but chances are the ones already out there can do better (e.g. apt, dnf, pacman, you name it). In fact, any tool you’d likely think of would’ve probably been created and tested.

    With that said, you still can learn a great deal. Maybe it would give you all the knowledge and skill to do better, might even come up with something new.

  • NeoNachtwaechter@lemmy.world
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    11 months ago

    Learn ZFS. I guess it isn’t included in typical tutorials, but if you spend a few days with practising on it, and also read some of the ‘deeper’ stuff about it, then afterwards you feel like you can do magic :-)

  • lemmyvore@feddit.nl
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    11 months ago

    After you do LFS try making a minimal bootable system (on a stick) and see what’s the bare minimum you can put on it to get a working console. Hint: init can be any executable or script, it doesn’t have to be complicated.

    You can also add useful tools like parted and make your own little mini-rescue distro that you can use when something goes wrong with your main system.

  • Hundun@beehaw.org
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    10 months ago

    The Linux Foundation hosts brilliant courses on OS virtualization in Linux - after that there is a pretty clear path at a cloud administrator career.